Whangarei tour

A brisk constitutional up 53 steps to a look out on the Tutukaka coastline was the first activity on our International Flying Rotarians weekend in Northland.

A brisk constitutional up 53 steps to a look out on the Tutukaka coastline was the first activity on our International Fellowship of Flying Rotarians weekend in Northland.

From the top, we looked back at the beach on one side ...

From the top, we looked back at the beach on one side …

...and coastline on the other.

…and coastline on the other.

 

Our host Lance told us about the dry stone walls which stretch for kilometres along the roadside and across farmland on the road between Whangarei and Tutukaka. Apparently the walls were built by Dalmatian settlers around 150 years ago. The purpose was two-fold - to clear farmland of volcanic stone so that it could be used for pasture and to create fields for the animals. Other settlers made life hard for the Dalmations as they did not like the way the Dalmations worked too hard!

Our host Lance told us about the dry stone walls which stretch for kilometres along the roadside and across farmland on the road between Whangarei and Tutukaka. Apparently the walls were built by Dalmatian settlers around 150 years ago. The purpose was two-fold – to clear farmland of volcanic stone so that it could be used for pasture and to create fields for the animals. Other settlers made life hard for the Dalmations as they did not like the way the Dalmations worked too hard!

 

Our next stopover, on the outskirts of Whangarei and only a few minutes easy walk from the carpark were the Whangarei Falls.

Our next stopover, on the outskirts of Whangarei and only a few minutes easy walk from the carpark were the Whangarei Falls.

 

The coach then took us to a lookout from where we looked down on Whangarei city ...

The coach then took us to a lookout from where we looked down on Whangarei city …

... and back over the parched Northland countryside. Dry dust filled the air, so the area lacked its usual clear visibility.

… and back over the parched Northland countryside. Dry dust filled the air, so the area lacked its usual clear visibility.

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Whangarei tour

  1. Iggy says:

    While at the coastline lookout, we saw a chap fall out of his kayak. He made it shore OK. In the meantime, the coastguard had been alerted. Fortunaltely a good outcome.

  2. I had gone back down to the beach by the time one of the observant Flying Rotarians spotted this. It was a relief when our tour leader heard that the kayaker had made it back to the beach. When we experienced the swells the next day (see the Poor Knights story) I can imagine how easily someone would have been toppled out of a kayak.

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